Back to resources

What Companies Can Do to Reduce Technical Debt

Dev Processes
Convincing
Tech Debt

8 March, 2022

Tejas Kokje
Tejas Kokje

Senior Software Engineer at Netflix, Inc

Tejas Kokje, Senior Software Engineer at Netflix, Inc., highlights how long-term thinking, planning, and organizing can reduce technical debt in a product organization.

Assessing Technical Debt Based on Dynamic Runtime

How to reduce technical debt?

In one of the previous companies I worked at, the challenge was: should we address the problems we have right now or add more features? This question gets asked quite often by different tech experts. As we kept adding features, we were not concerned about the technical debt we were taking on. Eventually, we knew that we could sustain that for a year or two, but afterward, it would become increasingly difficult to scale with the customer needs. A good metaphor around that would be owning a car with all the fancy features that won’t work more than a speed of 30 miles per hour.

How Planning and Organizing Can Reduce Technical Debt

To begin with my actions towards solving the problem, within the first six months, I started convincing the upper management and leadership to look at this. Per my prior experience and lessons, I knew what was coming and how much resources and headcount we needed to solve the technical debt.

The good part is that the upper management believed in me, and per the new releases, they had to slow down and focus more on improving the quality of the product. As revenue remains one of the main goals for most startups, in this case, we did not mainly focus on that. Instead, we had a fine balance between the technical debt and new features.

We slowed down on adding the new features, but at the same time, we collaborated with product management to figure out the priority of the features. Besides, we scrutinized how much revenue each of those features would bring in. We shortlisted some of the features that would bring in the most value and revenue based on the data-driven information.

Being a smaller company, if your product is not stable or robust, it may impact the first impression on the customers. After convincing them to put some headcount to improve the product, finally, after two years, we were at a place where everything was rock solid. Plus, we had a good balance of adding new features while fixing the existing ones; perhaps not the same velocity as before, but feasible.

Convince Your Seniors

  • In real life, we’d always prefer having lesser financial debt, and so in the tech world, having less technical debt would be a savior. Although some debt, like student debt, would help you grow. A similar concept applies to the product world — take the technical debt that’d allow you to increase feature velocity, but avoid shortcuts.
  • The higher leadership is usually disconnected from what’s happening in reality, so you need to communicate and convince them at all times. Ensure that they are aware of the complexities that the engineers are dealing with regularly. Especially, avoid using technical jargon; explain to them in a language that they understand and what it would take for the product to succeed.

Discover Plato

Scale your coaching effort for your engineering and product teams
Develop yourself to become a stronger engineering / product leader


Related stories

Navigating Disagreements When It Comes to Priorities

9 May

Pavel Safarik, Head of Product at ROI Hunter, shares his insights on how to deal with disagreements about prioritization when building a product.

Innovation / Experiment
Product Team
Product
Dev Processes
Conflict Solving
Internal Communication
Collaboration
Convincing
Strategy
Prioritization
Pavel Safarik

Pavel Safarik

Head of Product at ROI Hunter

Balancing Technical Debt Innovation: How Roadmaps for Development Help Your Company Succeed

4 May

Brad Jayakody outlines the roadmap to maintaining a healthy balance between technical debt and team growth. However, just as balancing acts go it is important to have a strong foundation.

Alignment
Leadership
Impact
Roadmap
Tech Debt
Career Path
Brad Jayakody

Brad Jayakody

Director of Engineering at Motorway

Why You Should Take Technology Risks in Product Development

25 April

Matias Pizarro, CTO and VP of Residents at ComunidadFeliz, recalls a time in his early career when he took a technology risk that had wide-ranging benefits to his product's user experience.

Innovation / Experiment
Product
Scaling Team
Dev Processes
Matias Pizarro

Matias Pizarro

CTO and VP of Residents at ComunidadFeliz

Company Growth: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

18 March

Renaldi, Director of Engineering at Boku Inc., shares his guide for improving problem-plague processes into strategic initiatives.

Dev Processes
Feedback
Strategy
Team Processes
Renaldi Renaldi

Renaldi Renaldi

Director of Engineering at Boku Inc

The Evolution of a Startup Co-Founder

15 March

Shawn Sullivan, Co-founder & CTO at Phase Genomics, shares how his career has spanned from working at a tech giant to co-founding a startup in every stage of his growth.

Changing A Company
Dev Processes
Company Culture
Impact
Convincing
Changing Company
Career Path
Shawn Sullivan

Shawn Sullivan

Cofounder & CTO at Phase Genomics

You're a great engineer.
Become a great engineering leader.

Plato (platohq.com) is the world's biggest mentorship platform for engineering managers & product managers. We've curated a community of mentors who are the tech industry's best engineering & product leaders from companies like Facebook, Lyft, Slack, Airbnb, Gusto, and more.