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The Essentiality of Identifying ‘Who You Are’ When Hiring

Hiring

1 April, 2019

Chris Haag
Chris Haag

Vice President of Engineering at Salesforce

Chris Haag describes the importance of knowing who you are as a manager, a team, and as a company during the hiring process.

Problem

Hiring software engineers gets more competitive every year. Traditional businesses like banks, healthcare providers, and automotive shops are also hiring engineers in addition to those of us in technology-related fields. This is creating so much demand that talent is being pulled from other disciplines. We see folks who are leaving behind careers in law, biology, architecture, chemistry, and even medicine. As a result, it is more important than ever to know who you are as a hiring manager, as an engineering team, and as a company when you begin the hiring process.

Actions taken

As a Manager Candidates will be judging you at the same time you are judging them. Think about what your management style is and be mindful of the impression you make. It can be easy to get so focused on the process of interviewing, that you lose sight of this. Start with your own self-assessment, and then ask if there is room in the process for the candidate to get to know you. Many of us are promoted into management because we drive toward goals efficiently. That same drive may hinder your ability to communicate your management style. So as a manager, you need to be aware of how you present yourself to potential candidates.

As an Engineering Team Sit down with the entire team and ask what kind of engineering team are we? What are the characteristics we value in ourselves? What skills do we have and need on the team? What are our core values? We spent an hour and came up with a list of what we will look for in future colleagues. I think each team should go through this exercise on their own, but a couple of things we focused on were values and skills.

As a Company Every company claims to prioritize their "culture" and many actually do. So having a good culture is becoming table stakes. How do you convey both your company and your engineering culture to the candidate? Be sure to have some compelling anecdotes ready. Do you value autonomy in your engineering culture? Great, then have a story to support that assertion. We found the folks at "Job Portraits" to be useful in helping us tell our story.

Lessons learned

  • Learn how to listen. Do you respond in an emotionally appropriate way? For example, if they mention a startup experience that ended with the company running out of money, do you say "that must of have been stressful and awful, I'm sorry you went through that..."? Or, do you blow past these potentially traumatic events as you're in a hurry to get through all your phone screen questions?
  • Learn how to interrupt. You'll have to cut candidates off from time to time to cover all your questions. Do you hack into the conversation like a butcher or, like a surgeon, do you find that perfect pause to interject?
  • Learn how to be respectful of the candidate's time. If you need a few minutes beyond the time allotted, be sure to ask.

Source: https://www.agari.com/email-security-blog/lessons-learned-hiring-software-engineers-bubble/

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