Back to resources

Securing Buy-In for New Metrics

Productivity
Team Processes

23 February, 2021

Cody Kurz
Cody Kurz

Director of Engineering at 7shifts: Restaurant Scheduling

Cody Kurz, Director of Engineering at 7shifts, details how he managed to secure buy-in for new metrics from a team that was largely skeptical and distrusted the management.

Problem

After considerable deliberation, we decided to start collecting the data about our key processes that managers could use to identify strengths and weaknesses across different teams. Though we were very transparent about the data we were collecting, many of our employees became anxious and assumed that we would use them to fire people who were not performing up to the standards. We had to keep re-emphasizing that these metrics were not intended to fire/demote anyone and that poor metrics wouldn’t imply that someone was a poor-performing employee. We extensively communicated what was the goal of the metrics -- to analyze what things, not people, were broken and why.

Actions taken

We decided to mainly focus on pull request flows and measure the times from pull requests being open and interacted with to being completed and merged. Each of those steps gave a lot of insight into where the team was being held up. It became apparent that teams would focus on their own work and were not helping the rest of the organization with pull requests. People were expecting someone else to take care of it, and because it was a prevalent mentality, it took a long time for pull requests to be dealt with.

As we were emphasizing specific metrics, we noticed that the team cohesion strengthened and that the team started to operate more like a team as opposed to a loose group of individuals. They could see what the things we cared about were and that we were concerned about how the team was performing rather than how particular individuals were doing. Also, the team soon realized that some of those metrics could help them grow in the direction we cared about.

However, things didn’t go as smoothly as we hoped for. Initially, the team assumed that the goal was to use metrics for individual performance assessments, and they were largely skeptical. They falsely understood metrics as something that would get them in trouble and would impact if they would get raises or not. But, as they started to improve their performance due to the metrics we introduced, they also realized that those metrics provided them with more ammunition when it came to performance assessment and salary reviews. The metrics provided them data-based arguments to discuss their performance with their managers instead of having to take their managers’ subjective assessment for granted. Moreover, the same could be applied to managers, who had some solid data to corroborate their arguments.

Even when things were not going well and the stats were poor, the sheer numbers could become a great starting point for discussing what they could improve and shed light on some aspects of their performance they were not aware of. That also meant that they could much faster fix their weaknesses because metrics would spare them thinking if their manager liked them or not. They will have an opportunity to assess their own numbers, compare them with the company’s average and track their own progress.

Lessons learned

  • Communication is everything. Make sure that you communicate clearly why you want to introduce new metrics and how you intend to use them. That is essentially important for securing buy-in and enforcing more data-driven culture.
  • Some people will merely assume the worst intentions. Keep re-emphasizing what your intentions are, and that will hopefully help them overcome their own negative thoughts.
  • Introducing cycle time metrics around reviews, pull requests, and bug meantime to resolution proved hugely successful. Some of the metrics like bug meantime to resolution helped connect engineers with our customers and showed them that fixing the bugs is something we value greatly.
  • We also found a significant value in introducing metrics around the amount of time spent on a story combined with its estimate, which should disclose how accurate people’s estimates are. A lot of people shy away from framing it as a goal, but our intent was to show the team whether they were doing it consistently or not and to establish if a one-point story is -- most of the time, at least -- half of a two-point story.

Discover Plato

Scale your coaching effort for your engineering and product teams
Develop yourself to become a stronger engineering / product leader


Related stories

Team Development Framework for new managers

26 June

Individual Contributors are familiar with a technical development framework that helps them with building products. Managers, especially new managers can leverage a parallel framework to help them build their teams while drawing analogies from an already familiar framework.

Building A Team
Team Processes
New Manager
Viswa Mani Kiran Peddinti

Viswa Mani Kiran Peddinti

Sr Engineering Manager at Instacart

Promoting Interdepartmental Teamwork for More Efficient Problem-Solving

13 June

Roland Fiala, Senior Vice President of Engineering at Productsup, raises an interesting issue about autonomy in teams: does it hinder collaboration opportunities that lead to better problem-solving? He shares his system for promoting teamwork in engineering departments.

Internal Communication
Collaboration
Roadmap
Team Processes
Cross-Functional Collaboration
Roland Fiala

Roland Fiala

Senior Vice President of Engineering at Usergems

How to Motivate Your Engineers to Grow in Their Careers

13 June

Roland Fiala, Senior Vice President of Engineering at Productsup, highlights the importance of soft skills and shares how he motivates his engineers to further their careers by focusing on personal growth.

Goal Setting
Different Skillsets
Handling Promotion
Personal Growth
Coaching / Training / Mentorship
Motivation
Team Processes
Career Path
Performance
Roland Fiala

Roland Fiala

Senior Vice President of Engineering at Usergems

Checking For Values Alignment When Considering a New Role

20 June

Tommy Morgan, VP Engineering at Crystal Knows, recalls a time in his career when his values didn’t align with his superiors and shares his insights on preventing this outcome when taking on a new role.

Changing A Company
Goal Setting
Managing Expectations
Company Culture
Leadership
Productivity
Convincing
Motivation
Psychological Safety
Toxic Atmospheres
Health / Stress / Burn-Out
Performance
Tommy Morgan

Tommy Morgan

VP Engineering at Crystal Knows

Managing Remotely: Balancing Team Cohesion and Focus Time

26 May

Jonathan Belcher, Engineering Manager at Curative, explains how to balance team cohesion and individual focus time, tapping into his experiences of working remotely for seven years.

Remote
Micromanagement
Meetings
Internal Communication
Productivity
Psychological Safety
Performance
Jonathan Belcher

Jonathan Belcher

Engineering Manager - Patient Experience at Curative