Back to resources

How to Ensure a Successful Paternity Leave

Alignment
Delegate
Strategy
Team Reaction
Prioritization
Performance

7 December, 2021

Harry Wolff
Harry Wolff

Director of Engineering at MongoDB

Harry Wolff, Director of Engineering at MongoDB, shares how he planned for his paternity leave, creating documentation and roadmaps for his team during his absence.

How a Team Struggles During a Leave of Absence

Throughout my career, I've gone on paternity leave twice. In my company, paternity leave is 20 weeks long, creating a significant gap for a team to work independently of their manager. It was challenging to set my team members up for success for such a long period. Before my leave, my main goal was to ensure that my absence did not weigh down my manager.

I felt as if I had to reverse my thinking to understand what documentation, tasks, and projects would be needed during my leave. It was vital for me to ensure leaders were in place to answer questions or concerns and provide resources for my team. I found it exciting yet challenging to plan for my absence and establish goals for my team to complete while I was away.

Ensuring a Successful Leave of Absence

Planning Workloads:

There were many tactful steps that I needed to take to ensure my team was set up for success. First, I created a centralized document that detailed my responsibilities as a manager and who would be accountable for them during my absence. Many of these tasks were delegated to senior engineers on my team that I trusted, but a few required my manager's input.

I created a timeline for those internal and external to my team, providing a clear view of each project and task. I discovered that alignment was essential during this process. Without cohesion between my team and other departments, the transition would be less successful.

Understanding Pain Points:

Another vital step I took during this process was identifying the pain points that my team would feel without my presence. To that end, I listed everything that I thought would slow down my team and worked to proactively remove any obstacles they may face. During this process, I learned that I was not the only one that should know certain things. My team acted with more autonomy when they were exposed to information only I knew previously.

Coming Back from an Absence:

I discovered that the most prominent challenge during this process was coming back to the office after paternity leave. First of all, I had to get up to speed on all the projects, tasks, and anything else that my team completed during my break. Secondly, it was difficult to get back into the cadence of working with my team. During the 20 weeks, individuals' feelings and sentiments evolved, about myself, the team, and their work.

It was difficult to provide feedback or praise about the work a team completed while I was away. Since I only heard about, rather than experienced it, I was unable to fully incorporate their performance into my feedback.

Ramping Up After an Absence

  • It takes around two to four weeks for a team to absorb an individual into a group after an absence. The first month back feels less busy than usual until your company brings you up to speed and you can perform duties with your team again.

Discover Plato

Scale your coaching effort for your engineering and product teams
Develop yourself to become a stronger engineering / product leader


Related stories

Bootstrapping a Startup While Working Full-Time

23 June

Lucjan Suski, CEO & Co-founder of Surfer, relates how he started a company as a side project and shares his insights on bootstrapping tech startups.

Innovation / Experiment
Motivation
Strategy
Lucjan Suski

Lucjan Suski

Co-founder, formerly CTO and CEO at Surfer

How to Help Employees Find Their Strengths and Passions

22 June

Łukasz Biedrycki, VP of Engineering at BlockFi, talks about the importance of building on your strengths and finding your passions to maximize your impact. He dives into the tactics that managers can use to support their teammates in this pursuit.

Different Skillsets
Personal Growth
Leadership
Motivation
Career Path
Performance
Łukasz Biedrycki

Łukasz Biedrycki

VP of Engineering at BlockFi

Managing Through a Team Reorganization

15 June

Mugdha Myers, former Engineering Manager at Google, discusses the challenges of leading a team through the ambiguity and anxiety caused by a large-scale team restructuring.

Alignment
Changing A Company
Strategy
Changing Company
Mugdha Myers

Mugdha Myers

Engineering Manager at Google

Dealing with Uncertainties and Adapting as You Go

14 June

Muhammad Hamada, Engineering Manager at HelloFresh, addresses the uncertainties brought on by the pandemic, how these have affected our work environments, and how we can adapt.

Goal Setting
Internal Communication
Collaboration
Roadmap
Stakeholders
Prioritization
Muhammad Hamada

Muhammad Hamada

Engineering Manager at HelloFresh

How to Motivate Your Engineers to Grow in Their Careers

13 June

Roland Fiala, Senior Vice President of Engineering at Productsup, highlights the importance of soft skills and shares how he motivates his engineers to further their careers by focusing on personal growth.

Goal Setting
Different Skillsets
Handling Promotion
Personal Growth
Coaching / Training / Mentorship
Motivation
Team Processes
Career Path
Performance
Roland Fiala

Roland Fiala

Senior Vice President of Engineering at Productsup

You're a great engineer.
Become a great engineering leader.

Plato (platohq.com) is the world's biggest mentorship platform for engineering managers & product managers. We've curated a community of mentors who are the tech industry's best engineering & product leaders from companies like Facebook, Lyft, Slack, Airbnb, Gusto, and more.