Back to resources

How Initiative Can Gain You a Promotion?

Handling Promotion
Leadership
Meetings
Internal Communication
Feedback
Coaching / Training / Mentorship

4 February, 2022

Artem Vysotsky
Artem Vysotsky

Software Engineering Manager / Staff Software Engineer at People.ai

Artem Vysotsky, Team lead Manager at people.ai, shares his recommendations to gain a promotion by being explicit with your manager and implementing a promotion plan.

Taking the Initiative to Pave Your Destiny

Many people come to me wondering how they can gain a promotion. Some time ago, I was in that position myself learning that nobody owed me anything unless I proved myself. The mindset that somebody has to hand down a promotion is the wrong mentality, as it’s best to get it. At the end of the day, you own your density.

Many managers are too busy to notice their report’s signals. The reality is that only 30% of the time, leaders will share clear steps regarding the career path and promotion. Many companies have confusing and challenging career paths; these can ultimately halt the growth of team members.

Taking Action to Implement a Promotion Plan

When starting on the journey to receive a promotion, step one is to change your mentality. The idea that someone is going to hand you a promotion may work, but it won’t be as quick as you want.

After changing your mindset, it’s time to be explicit with direct managers and leadership. Explain to them exactly where you want to go and ask them what you can do to meet those requirements. In my experience, certain managers will recognize this while others may not be trained to handle promotions efficiently. Depending on the next steps, I recommend beginning to act in your ideal role.

In many companies, you need to take action first to get promoted. From my experience, the easiest way to ‘take action’ is to follow your manager’s duties and begin taking over responsibilities. Your manager already knows what they are doing, meaning if you perform tasks like your manager, you already act on a managerial level. For some, it may be challenging to start operating at the managers level; I recommend:

  • Asking your manager how you can help them. By connecting with your manager, you show interest while gaining practical experience for your next role. I have used my manager’s tasks like a roadmap to plan for my promotion.
  • Following up on your assigned tasks. Once your manager has delegated some of their work to you, it is vital to begin regularly connecting with them. Schedule a one-on-one weekly or bi-weekly to discuss your progress, feedback, and the promotion plan.

The Importance of a Promotion Plan:

From my experiences, having a promotion plan is the critical part of receiving the role you want. The plan should provide a concrete step-by-step guide on the tasks and projects you need to complete to become a manager. Ideally, this plan outlines the progression you’ve made while showing your manager that you’ve been progressing as an individual.

Physical documentation provides a point of reference that neither party can disagree on. By scheduling regular meetings and keeping a line of communication, ideally, it will take you around half a year to meet your goals and be up for promotion.

Providing Career Growth Mentorship

So far at Plato, I’ve provided mentorship to a data scientist looking to grow at a startup without a career path. By implementing the promotion plan with his direct managers, he built a program for himself to hit the next level.

Discover Plato

Scale your coaching effort for your engineering and product teams
Develop yourself to become a stronger engineering / product leader


Related stories

The Art of Asking Why: Narrowing the Gap Between Customers and Users

24 May

Jord Sips, Senior Product Manager at Mews, shares his expertise on a common challenge for product managers – finding root causes and solutions.

Customers
Innovation / Experiment
Product
Personal Growth
Leadership
Stakeholders
Users
Jord Sips

Jord Sips

Senior Product Manager at Mews

Managing Different Timezones: Inclusive Collaboration Methods

19 May

Jonathan Belcher, Engineering Manager at Curative, shares an unknown side of synchronous communication tools and advises managers on how to handle a team that’s spread across the globe.

Remote
Internal Communication
Collaboration
Cross-Functional Collaboration
Jonathan Belcher

Jonathan Belcher

Engineering Manager - Patient Experience at Curative

Streamlining Product Processes After a Reorganization

16 May

Snehal Shaha, Lead Technical Program Manager at Momentive (fka SurveyMonkey), details her short-term technical strategy to unify processes among teams following an acquisition.

Acquisition / Integration
Product Team
Product
Building A Team
Leadership
Internal Communication
Collaboration
Reorganization
Strategy
Team Processes
Cross-Functional Collaboration
Snehal Shaha

Snehal Shaha

Senior EPM/TPM at Apple Inc.

Managing Culturally Diverse Remote Teams

11 May

Tom Hill, Engineering Manager at Globality, Inc., shares how he works with a culturally diverse team based within a thirteen-hour time gap.

Scaling Team
Handling Promotion
Remote
Onboarding
Hiring
Cultural Differences
Tom Hill

Tom Hill

Engineering Manager at Torii

Navigating Disagreements When It Comes to Priorities

9 May

Pavel Safarik, Head of Product at ROI Hunter, shares his insights on how to deal with disagreements about prioritization when building a product.

Innovation / Experiment
Product Team
Product
Dev Processes
Conflict Solving
Internal Communication
Collaboration
Convincing
Strategy
Prioritization
Pavel Safarik

Pavel Safarik

Head of Product at ROI Hunter

You're a great engineer.
Become a great engineering leader.

Plato (platohq.com) is the world's biggest mentorship platform for engineering managers & product managers. We've curated a community of mentors who are the tech industry's best engineering & product leaders from companies like Facebook, Lyft, Slack, Airbnb, Gusto, and more.